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Archive for May, 2011

Three terrific audio slideshows

1. “Surf Town Canada” from CBC is a bit long, but it uses ambient sound well. Awesome action shots and lot of variety in perspective. It keeps me interested the whole way through.

2. I remember this one from the LA Times after seeing it in another class. It moves a little slow but that also fits perfectly with the subject — waiting to die. The photography is beautiful.

3. From The New York Times and their “One in 8 Million” series: a story about an “urban taxidermist.” For me, the story is unusual, creepy and interesting, and the black and white photos work great.

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Lessons from the Soundslide Proof of Concept

May 20, 2011 1 comment

My main goal in turning my interview with Wes Miles into a soundslide was to see if I could take a music-related story and make it somewhat compelling. I found cutting the interview down easy — I also found that it flowed pretty nicely. The photography was much more difficult. I had to use a few courtesy photos and I have some shots that are just ‘okay’ to me. So I decided to get creative. The middle section of the soundslide is filled with rotating CDs that took a ton of time to shoot and put together in the soundslide program. As for any music I wanted to use, well, I decided against it — too messy legally, even if my project would probably count towards “fair use.”

This is my third soundslide I’ve made in the past year and a half and I have to say, I think I’m the happiest with this one. Looking back, my first was awful (no surprise) and my second was mostly boring. This is at least interesting, to me at least. If I could go back in time, I would have taken more photos at the concert. I would have maybe gone to Capitol Hill and went for the Block Party angle a bit more. Lots of little things. But not so bad overall.

Categories: Assignments, COM466, Projects Tags:

Wes Miles on Songwriting and Discovery

May 20, 2011 1 comment

Ra Ra Riot — a Syracuse-based band from Syracuse, NY and signed to Seattle-based label Barsuk — released their sophomore album, “The Orchard,” last August. Following in the footsteps of their acclaimed debut, “The Rhumb Line,” the album features string arrangements, terrific songwriting and soaring vocals provided by frontman Wes Miles. While the album was just released in Europe, Ra Ra Riot was recently announced as a headliner at this year’s Capitol Hill Block Party in July. In this interview, Miles discusses songwriting for “The Orchard” and his side-project, Discovery.

Watch the soundslide (1:42)

Categories: Assignments, COM466, Projects Tags:

Putting Together the Soundslide Proof of Concept Project

Coming soon: Ra Ra Riot — a Syracuse-based band from Syracuse, NY and signed to Seattle-based label Barsuk — released their sophomore album, “The Orchard,” last August. Following in the footsteps of their acclaimed debut, “The Rhumb Line,” the album features string arrangements, terrific songwriting and soaring vocals provided by frontman Wes Miles. While the album was just released in Europe, Ra Ra Riot was today announced as a headliner at this year’s Capitol Hill Block Party in July. In this interview, Miles discusses songwriting for “The Orchard” and his side-project, Discovery.

Categories: Assignments, COM466, Projects Tags:

Chatting About Osama bin Laden’s Death on KBCS Radio

May 13, 2011 1 comment

Courtesy of erieyohoho.com

Direct link to mp3

On Wednesday, a panel including myself and two other members of the greater Seattle community appeared on “Voices of Diversity” — a show on local radio station KBCS 91.3 FM in Bellevue — discussing Osama bin Laden’s death. It was truly a fascinating conversation. I was invited on after my opinion column entitled “What bin Laden’s death means to our generation.” Here’s the description from the station’s website:

President Obama told the nation a small team of NAVY Seals killed Osama bin Laden at a compound in Pakistan. The president’s dramatic announcement brought cheering crowds into the streets in cities and on campuses across the country. Some media pundits criticized the celebratory mood. Others felt the reaction was appropriate. What do you think? How did you react to the news of Osama’s death? Today on Voices of Diversity we talk to local residents from a variety of backgrounds, all with strong feelings about the killing of Osama bin Laden and its aftermath.

Host

Sonya Green

Guests 

Lynn Fitz-Hugh is clerk of the Eastside Friends Meeting. The Friends are also known as the Quakers and Lynn has been one all her life. She is also a practicing psychotherapist, a wife and a mother.

Tarek Dawoud is a member of the Downtown Muslim Association and speaker on Islam. Tarek is also President of the Washington chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations and a native of Egypt.

Bryden McGrath is a University of Washington student and journalist for the University of Washington Daily newspaper.

#FF (Follow Friday): Pacific Northwest journalists

1. @TheNewsChick (local) Linda Thomas – Twitter enthusiast, lots of great links and, of course, the anchor in the mornings on KIRO FM.

2. @sona23 (local) Sona Patel – Associate producer for social media at The Seattle Times.

3. @pdebarros (local) Paul de Barros – Great music writer at The Seattle Times.

4. @barlowkm (local) Katrina Barlow – News producer at The Seattle Times, enough said!

5. @jontalton (local) Jon Talton – Lots of great economic/business tweets.

Reflecting on the Photo Story — Challenges, Goals and People

In trying to tell a visual story of a small town hit by the economic downturn, I clearly wanted to focus on how the town has changed. I tried to do this through the order of the photos I chose — an introduction to the town (first photo), a comparison to some history (second photo), and then getting into some obvious visuals that could be associated with an economic recession. I’d say my biggest challenge was just covering the town. It may be small but it’s still a town with plenty of areas and neighborhoods. Choosing where to go and what to shoot in a limited amount of time (about two hours) was the toughest part of it all.

Overall, I think I met a lot of my goals. For the most part, it turned out how I envisioned besides the fact that I’m not some professional photographer. In terms of learning, this project just continued my education in photography. There are a few shots I’m pretty proud of (specifically some of the color and composition in a few photos), but considering I took around 100 photos or so, I obviously still have tons to learn. And I feel like that comes with experience. If I had a chance to redo this assignment, I’d want to at least give myself some more time and explore areas I wasn’t able to get to (or park and get out of my car at the time). There are at least a couple specific places and images in my mind that I wish I could have gotten to. Furthermore, I’d try to get more people in my photos. People, at least to me, are far more compelling than most photos of buildings.